Today In History: All Danish Possessions In Gold Coast Sold To The British On March 30, 1850

The Danish Gold Coast comprised of the colonies that Denmark–Norway controlled in Africa as a part of the Gold Coast (roughly present-day southeast Ghana), which is on the Gulf of Guinea.

It was colonized by the Dano-Norwegian fleet, first under indirect rule by the Danish West India Company (a chartered company), later as a crown colony of the kingdom of Denmark-Norway.

The first Danish East India Company was chartered in 1616 under King Christian IV and focused on trade with India.

During the Napoleonic Wars, in 1801 and again in 1807, the British Navy attacked Copenhagen. As a consequence of the last attack, Denmark (one of few West European countries not occupied by Bonaparte) lost its entire fleet and the island of Helgoland (part of the duchy of Holstein-Gottorp) to Britain. Denmark finally sold its remaining settlements in mainland India in 1845 and the Danish Gold Coast on March 30, 1850, both to the British.

The Napoleonic Wars were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom.

Source: Kuulpeeps.com

Click on the comment box below and leave us your thoughts. Thank you

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here