#BlackHistoryMonth: This South African Doctor Is The First To Perform Transplant Surgery To Cure Deafness

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Professor Mashudu Tshifularo (credit: Black History)

Mashudu Tshifularo, a South African doctor, and his medical team became the first in the world to cure a 35-year-old patient’s deafness by using 3D printing technology. Tshifularo, who is also a professor at the University of Pretoria Faculty of Health Sciences, was able to replace the damaged bones of the patient’s ear by recreating the anvil, hammer, stirrup, and ossicles, which make up the inner ear, with similarly-shaped titanium pieces produced on a 3D printer.

Professor Mashudu Tshifularo and his team (via Cape Town Etc)

The University of Pretoria believes that the procedure “may be the answer to conductive hearing loss, a middle ear problem caused by congenital birth defects, infection, trauma or metabolic diseases.”

The groundbreaking surgery was performed at Steve Biko Academic Hospital, where the patient, who had lost his hearing due to a car accident, unfortunately, damaged the inside of his ear. However, thanks to the surgeons, the surgery that took less than two hours, and the team purports to have restored his hearing successfully.

Tshifularo believes that this innovative technique will be the answer to all of those patients suffering from hearing loss regardless of their age.

The University of Pretoria and Tshifularo are looking for partners and funding to standardize the procedure of 3D printed middle ear transplants.

Professor Mashudu Tshifularo performing the surgery (via Gaunteng Health)

As Tshifularo said: “3D technology is allowing us to do things we never thought we could, but I need sponsors and funding for this invention to take off the ground.”

Tshifularo grew up as a herdsman in the village of Mbahela outside Thohoyandou, in Venda, and has faced many financial challenges in furthering his education, but that didn’t stop him from reaching his dream. Although he has been spending the last ten years studying conductive hearing loss and he is now busy with his second PhD degree at the University of Pretoria, in the last two years he started looking into the use of 3D printing technology.

Tshifularo passed all his degrees within five years because, as he stated, he was focused.

“People like me never arrive. After climbing one mountain we want to climb another one. If I was easily satisfied I would have never achieved all the breakthroughs in my life,” Tshifularo added.

3D printers have proved to be extremely useful and needed in the medical industry. In Australia, for example, a 3D bioprinter called 3D Alek was developed to create replicas of the human ear for reconstructive surgery, especially for patients who suffer microtia.

See Also:

Carter G Woodson: The Man Who Created Black History Month

#BlackHistoryMonth: Meet Dr Shirley Jackson, Inventor Of Caller ID And Call Waiting

Adom Appiah: This 15 Year Old Raised $70000 For His Community Through Basketball

source: 3dprint

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