Diggy Simmons Pays Touching Tribute To Ghana And Africa After His Recent Visit

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Diggy Simmons

#DecemberInAccra last year was one of the best we’ve had so far.

Not the least due to the back to back events but more so because this year our city Accra and Ghana as a whole, played host to a number of influential and high profile brothers and sisters.

Thanks to the amazing work by Boris Kodjoe and Bozoma Saint-John, dozens of black Holywood celebrities visited Ghana to celebrate Christmas and ring in the New Year with us.

For many of them, the trip to Ghana is the first time they are setting foot in Africa, the land from which their ancestors were savagely sold into slavery and hardship.

2019 marks 400 years since the first slaves landed on the shores of America and the Carribean which is why coming back to the land they call the ‘Motherland’ is a “Full Circle” for these black Holywood celebrities.

Daniel Dwayne Simmons III, better known by his stage name Diggy Simmons or commonly just Diggy, is an American rapper, singer, model, and actor and the fourth child of Joseph “Rev. Run” Simmons of Run DMC.

Diggy Simmons

Most of us first saw him in the family’s reality show, Run’s House.

“Perhaps I’m ignorant. Perhaps I have been for some time now. Many of my perceptions, or misperceptions rather, were overdue to be rightfully shattered. It’s a shame—as one with many friends from Cameroon, Nigeria, and other countries throughout the continent of Africa—that I have remained so unaware,” he said in a post on Instagram.

“These friends raved about their homelands, and somehow their praise fell upon deaf ears, in part due to that as a child, Africa, to me, seemed branded as less than alluring,” he said.

For most people in America and Europe, their view or perception of Africa is largely based on the visuals they see on their media platforms.

The stories of famine, war, electoral violence, poverty and sheer devastation are what they have come to associate with the continent.

“The media and my societal narrative have often viewed Africa with a lens of violence, poverty, and underdevelopment. This portrayal has caused generations of Africans to abandon their own heritage and traditions,” Diggy Simmons said.

However, his trip to Ghana surely knocked down a few walls and changed the perceptions.

According to him, during his trip to Ghana, he’s never “felt more comfortable in a space. I don’t think I stopped my Shaku Shaku from the time I got off the plane. Every stereotype that’s been perpetuated never pointed to me feeling this free.”

“I was also fortunate enough to visit the slave dungeons in Cape Coast—small quarters where over a hundred of my potential ancestors were held captive on any given day with no nourishment, suffering in their own feces and urine,” he said.

“As heartbreaking as it was to stand on those grounds, my takeaway—apart from feeling both inspired and devastated—was a galvanized sense of pride. I felt as if I gained a more authentic and emboldened sense of self, furthering my own understanding of endurance through my ancestors’ plight,” he said.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Perhaps I’m ignorant. Perhaps I have been for some time now. Many of my perceptions, or misperceptions rather, were overdue to be rightfully shattered. It’s a shame—as one with many friends from Cameroon, Nigeria, and other countries throughout the continent of Africa—that I have remained so unaware. These friends raved about their homelands, and somehow their praise fell upon deaf ears, in part due to that as a child, Africa, to me, seemed branded as less than alluring. The media and my societal narrative has often viewed Africa with a lens of violence, poverty, and underdevelopment. This portrayal has caused generations of Africans to abandon their own heritage and traditions. During my trip to Ghana, I can’t say I’ve ever felt more comfortable in a space. I don’t think I stopped my Shaku Shaku from the time I got off the plane. Every stereotype that’s been perpetuated never pointed to me feeling this free. I was also fortunate enough to visit the slave dungeons in Cape Coast—small quarters where over a hundred of my potential ancestors were held captive on any given day with no nourishment, suffering in their own feces and urine. As heartbreaking as it was to stand on those grounds, my takeaway—apart from feeling both inspired and devastated—was a galvanized sense of pride. I felt as if I gained a more authentic and emboldened sense of self, furthering my own understanding of endurance through my ancestors’ plight. Thank you to @boriskodjoe @nicoleariparker @badassboz @thedebonairdisciple for the introduction to my truth. My year couldn’t have began with more clarity. 📸@joshuakissi

A post shared by Lighten Up (@diggysimmons) on

Diggy has been introduced to his truth and now he has the clarity of mind knowing where his ancestors came from and his sense of direction on what he is to do this year and many more to come.

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