The Kumvana Fellowship 2019 Is Opened For Applications

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The Kumvana Program is an initiative of Engineers Without Borders, Canada. They unlock human potential in sub-Saharan Africa by investing in forward-thinking social enterprises. They do this by supporting local innovators to accelerate their impact and apply their innovations on a global scale, to the benefit of millions

Engineers Without Borders, Canada is an international development organization that aims to unlock human potential and accelerate sustainable, inclusive global development through leadership development, advocacy and incubation of promising social enterprises. For more than 15 years, their vibrant community of thousands of innovative students, professionals and fellows have worked toward creating systemic change in Canada and Sub-Saharan Africa for belief in a thriving and sustainable world—a world where everyone can meet their basic needs and grow to their full potential.

The Kumvana program consists of an 8-week online learning course (approximately 3 hours per week), an African retreat, and a 1-month intensive Canadian experience. During the Fellows’ time in Canada, they will attend the EWB National Conference and receive specifically tailored training programs, a 3-day leadership development course, and participate in 2 weeks of organisational placements to learn from relevant professional networks. Participants will have the opportunity for an immersive cultural experience, and spend time living with Canadian host families.

The Kumvana Program gives its Fellows an opportunity to network and foster collaborations with Canadian professionals and extraordinary leaders from other African countries. Additionally, these changemakers will receive new skills, ideas, contacts, motivation and the potential to lead that will help guide their actions toward greater, sector-wide impact.

Apply for the 2019 Kumvana program, here.

Applications open until Tuesday, July 17th

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