Life

I’m on strike but don’t test my patients

I am a doctor. A regular doctor. Seven years of medical schooling and the works. I swore the Hippocratic oath. I swore to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant: I swore to respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and to gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow. I solemnly swore I GET MY SALARY. I get my allowances and some of my seniors get fuel. But I joined to the sit down action. Why? Because I’m a doctor. I can. After all, my job is secure.

I don’t care that the hospitals are understaffed and the death tolls are rising. What is it to me that the wards are spilling blood and pus? Do I care if Auntie Atta’s teenage daughter dies in labor? I’m on strike I will do no work. None.

Ghanaian taxpayers bear some of my schooling cost. Averagely I take about 3,900.00 home. Every month but I strike at the expense of the dying taxpayer.

Why?

I earn less than my co-professionals abroad. Should I consider the fact that they bear the total costs of their training themselves over there with credit financing at an interest rate of 8%? Or that most of them become doctors owing their states thousands of dollars to be paid by the month? That would give me no reason at all to set my stethoscope down.

Is that not unfair?

If there was any sense of morality left in these greedy medical doctors, they would apologize to the average Ghanaian for causing so much pain with their ungodly random strikes and disrespect for the hand that made them and continues to feed them.

Perhaps it is time for medical students to pay in full for their education. The taxpayer will be happy to loan them the money with 6% interest. Only then can they ask the government for higher and higher salaries.

Only then! But as it stands, they are greedy, inglorious and ungrateful.)

My superiors are agitating for increments. Wages, allowances, fuel allowance, end of service benefits…what not. Let them carry on. It’ll be good for me too. Though just four years ago our salaries went up 105% Really I’m just glad there’s a break. I was enjoying the holiday till your president, YOUR PRESIDENT, came and made that decision.

Cuban Doctors.

They’re going to get paid better? With free accommodation? Transportation? And it’s going to be more expensive than what my superiors are demanding?

Now I’m unsettled in my spirit. Look. Here’s my ward on t.v. My God! My patients! The convulsive child is now wrapped in white hospital linen.

It doesn’t prick my conscience. The Hippocratic oath also made me hypocritical. It happens all the time. In surgery, I’ve even caused a few. But who knows? Only I.

I will work now. After all I do need my job. Maybe not now, but later I’ll get my money. Don’t bring any more in. I know my job. Those are my patients. I’m infuriated. I swore to protect human life and preserve it to the best of my ability. I will resume under the oath. The strike is over. Send The Cuban doctors away. Immediately. And you already here; I am very angry.

Don’t test my patients.

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